19 December 2012

Video games and gun-related murders


Res ipsa loquitur. 

From The Washington Post.

12 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. Nice chart.

    I'd be interested in the rate of all murders, and perhaps the rates of all violent crimes.

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  3. ...and I was just saying to myself; "Interesting. This has been up here all day with no comments so far..."

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  4. The correlation becomes stronger when carried into the past, but unfortunately the wrong way. Before the invention of video games, humans were orders of magnitude more violent. Gun crimes were low, however.

    http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/history/postgraduate/ma_studies/mamodules/hi971/topics/interpersonal/long-term-historical-trends-of-violent-crime.pdf

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    Replies
    1. I don't see any correlation there at all. If I'm reading this right, US has slightly below median in the consumption of video games, and by far, the most gun-related murders.

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  5. How much money mass murderers sppent on video games compared to how much non-mass murderers spend on video games might be a bit more insightful. Or time spent playing vs time spent hurting other people.

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  6. People who play violent video games, listen to violent music and watch violent movies are more likely to commit acts of such violence. This isn't rocket science.

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    Replies
    1. Soldiers who have served in the U.S. military are more likely to become mass murderers when they return to civilian life. This isn't rocket science.

      See how easy it is to figure things out when you don't use data?

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    2. Can you not read the graph, Phil?

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  7. [citation needed]

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  8. Let's not forget that other, scrupulously ignored data set. You will need some Google-fu.

    Eric Harris age 17, Zoloft then Luvox)

    Jeff Weise, age 16, Prozac

    Cory Baadsgaard, age 16, Paxil

    Chris Fetters, age 13, Prozac.

    Christopher Pittman, Age 12, Zoloft.

    Mathew Miller, Age 13, Zoloft

    Fifteen-year-old Jarred Viktor, Paxil.

    Kip Kinkel, age 15, Prozac and Ritalin

    Luke Woodham, age 16, Prozac

    [Name withheld from media] Pocatello, ID age 12, Zoloft

    Michael Carneal, age 14, Ritalin

    [Name withheld from media] Huntsville, Alabama, Ritalin

    Andrew Golden, age 11, Ritalin and Mitchell Johnson, aged 14, Ritalin

    TJ Solomon, age 15, Ritalin

    Rod Mathews, age 14, Ritalin

    James Wilson, age 19, (various psychiatric drugs)

    Elizabeth Bush, age 13, Paxil

    Jason Hoffman, Effexor and Celexa

    Jarred Viktor, age 15, Paxil

    Chris Shanahan, age 15, Paxil

    Jeff Franklin (Prozac and Ritalin)

    Neal Furrow (Prozac)


    Alex Kim, age 13, Lexapro

    Diane Routhier Welbutrin

    Billy Willkomm, Age 17, Prozac

    Kara Jaye Anne Fuller-Otter, age 12, Paxil

    Gareth Christian, age 18, Paxil

    Julie Woodward, age 17, Zoloft

    Matthew Miller , 13, Zoloft

    Kurt Danysh, age 18 Prozac

    Woody ____, age 37, Zoloft.

    [Name withheld from media], Age 10, Prozac dosage was increased.

    Hammad Memon, Age 15, Zoloft and "other drugs for the conditions."

    Matti Saari, Age 22, Unspecified SSRI and a benzodiazapine.

    Steven Kazmierczak Prozac, Xanax and Ambien. Toxicology results showed that he still had trace amounts of Xanax in his system.

    Pekka-Eric, 18 unspecified antidepressants

    Asa Coon, Age 14 Trazodone.

    Jon Romano, age 16, unspecified medication for depression

    Kevin Rider, age 14,Prozac

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