21 April 2018

"Below Suspicion" and "Patrick Butler for the Defense"


I started my review of all of John Dickson Carr's detective novels with the classic "It Walks By Night," featuring detective Henri Bencolin, and then covered Bencolin's other four mysteries in two posts (here and here).  In December I reviewed detectives Rossiter and Gaunt in "Poison in Jest and The Bowstring Murders."

This post looks at the two detective novels featuring Patrick Butler.

Below Suspicion (1949)
John Dickson Carr introduces Patrick Butler, an arrogant and borderline unlikeable London attorney and self-styled sleuth, who in this novel is assisted by Gideon Fell.  Fell was well-known to the reading public by 1949, and well-known to the characters of this story ("you're the one - aren't you - who knows all about locked rooms"), but plays only a minor supporting role here.  The plot does involve serial poisonings in apparently-locked residences, but the elements of detection are diluted with quite a bit of derring-do and thriller aspects.  I rated the novel 2+ on my 1-4+ scale.  Herewith the interesting gleanings:
"In the room were a "plain deal table and two chairs."  The usage is not of "plain deal" but of a plain "deal table."  Deal = soft wood with implications of "cheap" or "humble."

"If it makes you feel better, my dear, I'll take my fee out of the next rich blacketeer who really is guilty."  The story is set in post-WWII London, so a "blacketeer" is a portmanteau word referring to a black-market racketeer.

"Mrs. Taylor was sitting up in bed, with her hand still on the bell-push.  It's the sort of bell-push they have in hospitals, with a long white cord fastened on the wall..."  Self-explanatory, but I've never heard the term before, despite spending 30+ years in hospitals.

"Acushla!" he chided her... I've already prepared your defense." Anglicization of the Irish word chuisle = "pulse" (of my heart).

"It was blowing a gale, but there was a dancy kind of moon."  I couldn't find this anywhere.

"Counsel for the defence, producing a key which he said belonged to the back door of his own house, demonstrated that it would fit the back door of "The Priory."  Calling witnesses, he showed that the lock was a "Grierson," which had been fitted to nine-tenths of the houses built in London during the 'fifties and 'sixties of the last century."  I was startled to discover that locks of older houses were not necessarily individually keyed in the post-WWII era.  Note also the use of the apostrophe on the dates to indicate the elided "eighteen," just as Carr uses 'phone on many occasions.

"By the Lord, I think you'd give anything on earth to see me come a cropper!"  A familiar phrase with obvious meaning, but I had to look up the derivation.  It obviously means to suffer a misfortune, but originally meant to take a bad fall off the back of a horse (crupper being the horse's hindquarters).  The Aussie equivalent is said to be "come a gutsa/gutser."

"He was a spiv and a drone and an eel and a butterfly!"  Wiktionary says flashy con artist, low common thief, slacker.  Some connotation of well-dressed, perhaps related to "spiffy?"

"Since it was past nine o'clock, all electric light and heat and gas had to be turned off..."  The novel is set in 1947.  Last year I did browse the book Austerity Britain, but had forgotten that utility shortages extended this long past the end of the war.

"A man was bashed about by two wide-boys in Renshaw's pay."  Thugs in context.  Definitions indicate a man who lives by his wits, wheeling and dealing, or a petty criminal.

"The moley was an extraordinary potato, its surface jagged with the edges of safety-razor blades.  They ground it into your face, twisted it, and--"  I couldn't find this.  ?prison slang

"The so-called club was hot and frowsty, not large and not much cleaner than the billiard-saloon below."  Musty, stuffy, stale, warm.  Variant of frowsy and maybe related to fusty (etymology: 14th c. from fust wine cask, from Old French: cask, tree trunk, from Latin fūstis cudgel, club.)

"Anybody got an electric torch?"  Flashlight, obviously.  Quaint.

"She swept up the knitting-bag and hared out."  Probably to run like a hare; I don't have time to look up everything.

"Modern secret societies, you know," Dr. Fell mused, "are mere tyros in their quickness to slash out and kill."  Beginner, novice, from Medieval Latin tyro, tīro (young soldier, recruit)

"We were skylarking, that's all.  No harm done."  Originally a nautical term "to jump about joyfully, frolic; to play around, play tricks."  ?presumably related to some behavior of the bird?

Patrick Butler for the Defense (1956)
Carr resurrected Patrick Butler seven years later for what in my estimation is a rather mediocre novel.  The "locked room" is weak, the protagonist unlikeable and the plot muddied with derring-do and comic overtones.  But I did find some interesting tidbits...
I mentioned in reviewing a previous book my surprise at seeing 'phone written with an apostrophe, and earlier in this post 'fifties and 'sixties.  In this story there is mention several times of the 'flu.

"His grey tie was pulled down skew-whiff from the hard collar..."  From askew (obviously) + weft to mean fabric out of alignment.  ?does this lead to "squiffy" meaning "drunk" ?

"The door was closed; or, as the barristers liked to say, sported."  Didn't find any help in the usual places.  Finally located this in the Bartleby definition of sport a door or oak: "To keep an outer door shut. In the Universities the College rooms have two doors, an outer and an inner one. The outer door is called the sporting door, and is opened with a key. When shut it is to give notice to visitors that the person who occupies the rooms is not at home, or is not to be disturbed. The word sport means to exhibit to the public, as, “to sport a new equipage,” “to sport a new tile [hat],” etc."

"Oh, bedad," he whispered..."  Irish "By God." (Patrick Butler is Irish).

"Can you think of a place more poetic to plot damnation to the spalpeens than in the sink of their own iniquity?"  More from the Irish: poor migratory farm worker, often viewed as a rascal or good-for-nothing.

"Will you kindly permit me to question my client, so that all of us may not land prematurely in chokey?"  British slang for prison, but why?

"Both of them were speaking ventriloquially, without moving their lips."  The meaning is obvious, but I have never seen the word used as an adverb!

 "It wouldn't have been so bad if they hadn't been so incarnadined polite." "Blood-red" by definition - presumably a play on the British use of "bloody."

"No noise!  Want the scotches on us?" The context indicates that it refers to the police.  Probably some British history related to this usage (?).

"They had thought Pam a beetle-wit, a dandelion-clock." Wiktionary: "The term is applied when the flower is used in a children's pastime by which the number of puffs needed to blow the filamentous achenes from a dandelion is supposed to tell the time."  Used here as a derogatory term for stupid or naive.

"Nobody knows.  I think I know.  But that's because more grasses come to me, with secret information..."  Slang term for police informer.

"Butler quietened Hugh as the call-boy, from mere force of habit, banged a fusillade of knocks on the dressing-room door."  A boy or man who summons actors when their presence is required for a performance.  I wonder if this is related to the "Call for Philip Morris" character in old cigarette ads?

"Before another day, I promise you, that damned old fraud will very much regret giving the cut-direct to his own nephew."  I found nothing on this.

"He was in a large and luxurious, if somewhat heavily and loweringly furnished, bedroom..."  With cloudiness or threatening gloom.  From ME louring.

 "Across the bedroom a door stood open to a sybaritic bathroom."  From Sybarita, an ancient Greek city in southeastern Italy noted for the luxurious, pleasure-seeking habits of many of its inhabitants.

"On the desk, at one side, lay a heavy stone paperweight.  This would do to smash the ring to flinders; to pound and crush its diamonds, if that were possible..."  Fragments, splinters, probably of Scandinavian origin: compare Norwegian flindra (splinter).

In Hugh's office, and between Butler and Lord Saxemund as might have been expected, there was progressing a truly memorable schemozzle."  A state of chaos and confusion, from Yiddish.

20 April 2018

If you were blind, you'd know why this doorknob is knurled


From the International Building Code:
26.11.4 Special hardware: Doors opening into hazardous areas shall have door-opening hardware which is knurled or has a roughened surface to give tactile warning to persons with visual impairments. Hazardous areas shall include but not be limited to loading platforms, boiler rooms, and electrical equipment rooms.

Of course then I had to look up "knurl" -
knurl:
  1. A contorted knot in wood.
  2. A crossgrained protuberance; a nodule; a boss or projection.
  3. A lined or crossgrained pattern of ridges or indentations rolled or pressed into a part for grip.

etymology:

knur +‎ -le (diminutive), from Middle English knar (knot in wood), earlier sense “a stone”, of Unknown origin.
gnarl is a later variant, from gnarled, via knurled.
Knurl related to "gnarly."  Cool.  You learn something every day.

Image cropped for size from the original at the Mildly Interesting subreddit.

"Industrial-scale" farming of cucumbers in central Wisconsin


100 years of polio in the U.S.


Quite a remarkable graph; the Salk vaccine was developed in 1952, tested in 1953-54, then used widely.

I was a "participant" in that epidemic of 1952.  My mother used to tell of me crying through one night with muscle cramps; I have no memory of that, but I do remember waking up the next morning, trying to stand by the bed, and falling to the floor because both legs were paralyzed.  After that followed a series of adventures in a Sister Kenny facility in Minneapolis and in later years the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, all of which undoubtedly molded me into the person I am today.

Graph from a superb webpage on polio statistics at Our World in Data - where you can find other pages on other health-related issues (smoking, suicide, cancer, HIV, malaria, etc).

Note - the embed is a screencap; the graph is interactive at the website.

Sheep farming in the hill country of New Zealand


I suppose some farmers have tried using drones not just for photography, but for the herding as well.  I hope drones never replace the dogs.

Vodka aisle in Polish supermarket


Via the Mildly Interesting subreddit.

This skull was extensively trepanned. For scruples. Updated.


Explained at io9:
Researchers at the University of Pisa, Italy, have solved a longstanding mystery around the honeycombed skull of one of the Italian martyrs beheaded by 15th century Ottoman Turk invaders when they refused to give up their Christian faith...

The skull was later drilled, most likely to obtain bone powder to treat diseases such as paralysis, stroke, and epilepsy, which were believed to arise from magical or demonic influences...

"The perfectly cupped shape of the incomplete perforations leads(us) to hypothesize the use of a particular type of trepan, with semi-lunar shaped blade or rounded bit; a tool of this type could not produce bone discs, but only bone powder," Fornaciari said...

This would make the Otranto skull a unique piece of evidence supporting historical accounts on the use of skull bone powder as an ingredient in pharmacological preparations...

Indeed, in his Pharmacopée universelle, a comprehensive work on pharmaceutical composition, French chemist Nicolas Lémery (1645 –1715) detailed how powdered human skull drunk in water was effective to treat "paralysis, stroke, epilepsy and other illness of the brain."

"The dose is from half scruple up to two scruples," Lémery wrote.

"The skull of a person who died of violent and sudden death is better than that of a man who died of a long illness or who had been taken from a cemetery: the former has held almost all of his spirits, which in the latter they have been consumed, either by illness or by the earth," he added.
Yes, I had to look it up too:
Scruple: a unit of apothecary weight, with symbol ℈. It is a twenty-fourth part of an ounce, or 20 grains, or approximately 1.3 grams. More generally, any small quantity might be called a scruple.  
Note this harvesting of bone powder with a trepan tool is a bit different from trepanning to treat disease in the patient on whom it is done.

Reposted from 2015 to add this photo of a trepanned cow skull:


Here's the abstract:
The earliest cranial surgery (trepanation) has been attested since the Mesolithic period. The meaning of such a practice remains elusive but it is evident that, even in prehistoric times, humans from this period and from the Neolithic period had already achieved a high degree of mastery of surgical techniques practiced on bones. How such mastery was acquired in prehistoric societies remains an open question. The analysis of an almost complete cow cranium found in the Neolithic site of Champ-Durand (France) (3400-3000 BC) presenting a hole in the right frontal bone reveals that this cranium underwent cranial surgery using the same techniques as those used on human crania. If bone surgery on the cow cranium was performed in order to save the animal, Champ-Durant would provide the earliest evidence of veterinary surgical practice. Alternatively, the evidence of surgery on this cranium can also suggest that Neolithic people practiced on domestic animals in order to perfect the technique before applying it to humans.
The full study is published in Nature (via Gizmodo).

I do wish that people would stop referring to trepanation as "brain surgery."  It is - as the Nature article authors state - "cranial surgery."

Bluebells

A woman sits on a tree trunk in the Hallerbos as bluebells bloom, in Halle, Belgium, on Thursday April 19, 2018. Bluebells (Hyacinthoides non-scripta) are particularly associated with ancient woodland where it may dominate the understorey to produce carpets of violet–blue flowers. The forest is a crowd favorite thanks to the beautiful purple flowers. (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert) (via)
4/20 has a different meaning for me than for many of my generation.  That is the approximate date on which the Blue-Eyed Marys (Collinsia verna) would be in peak bloom in the Raven Run nature sanctuary outside Lexington, Kentucky.  I have some memorable photos, but they are all on Kodachrome slides, and I need to find a way to digitize my old photo memories for the blog. [Iain, I haven't yet looked into the slide scanner you recommended]

Wealth inequality in the U.S.

According to Torsten Sløk, the chief international economist at Deutsche Bank Securities, income inequality is a major factor that has been holding back the U.S. economy for nearly a decade.

“One important reason why the expansion since 2009 has been so weak is that wealth gains have been unevenly distributed,” he wrote. “A decline in the homeownership rate and the number of households holding stocks has dampened consumer spending growth for the bottom 90% of households.”

Per his data, the median net worth for all income percentiles except the wealthiest one dropped between 2007 and 2016, usually by double-digit amounts
The wealthy and the corporate CEOs continue to recite the mantra that wealth "trickles down."

"We must make our choice.  We may have democracy, or we may have wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can't have both."
---- Supreme Court justice Louis Brandeis

Afghan mother determined to get an education


The video tells the story.

Cat owners will understand the humor


Via, where original credit is not listed.

Big hair


From a gallery of "hair-tossing horses."  Credit Wiebke Haas.

Enjoy a piano duet - updated



"Fran & Marlo Cowan (married 62 years) playing impromptu recital together in the atrium of the Mayo Clinic. He'll be 90 in February."
Found at Within the Crainium.

Addendum: The piece is “Put on Your Old Gray Bonnet.” More about the couple at MinnPost.

Updated from 2009 to add some new links.  After that spontaneous duet captured on the first video, the couple were invited back to the Mayo Clinic for other performances.

This video in 2010 compiles several of their routines.

This 2011 video covers their "final performance."

It's "old-time fun." 

Battle of the seasons


Spring and summer duking it out here in the Midwest.  A month ago I was weeding the garden and raking the yard.  Then winter returned.  Two days ago we got 7" of snow, bringing the April total to 13.5 - more than December, January, or February.

The crocuses in our front yard have been frost-bitten a couple times already.  (p.s. - my Green Bay Packer-fan neighbors haven't yet noticed that the crocuses in our front yard come up purple and gold in tribute to a different NFL team...)

Robins and other migratory birds are really suffering; many of them are ground-feeders, and unlike mammals their need for flight means they don't have large fat reserves to burn.  We and others in the area are putting out extra seed, and the birds swarm to those locations.  50-degree temps returning today, so hopefully these anomalous conditions are over.  For now.

13 April 2018

TYWKIWDBI is down - again (updated) [returning Friday, see Addendum]


Yesterday when my iMac started up, the usual "susumi" sound was absent and the screen opened up dark instead of grey.  The Apple logo appeared, along with the expected progress bar.

The progress bar evolved way too slowly, then stopped.  After an hour it was still frozen at about 95% complete.  I restarted while zapping the parameter RAM; that accomplished nothing.  And rebooting in the Safe mode (shift key down) didn't help.

So I went to my old Mac to look for help online.  When I rebooted in Recovery mode (command-R), I at least got a response:


I had already been to multiple other help sites, several of which suggested that the frozen progress bar at the end of the startup process probably indicated a problem with "permissions," which should be fixable using Disk Utility.  So I opened it...


... and clicked on the First Aid logo...


... and ran First Aid, hoping to repair permissions.  First Aid ran successfully...


... but after clicking "Done" the iMac still wouldn't complete the rebooting process.

On my old Mac (the one I'm using right now to access the blog) (running OSX Yosemite 10.10.5), the First Aid program presents the  option of repairing permissions:


But this new, crashed, iMac running OSX 10.13.something doesn't seem to offer that option.  ???

Of course, his may not be a permissions problem at all.  Does anyone know what might be causing this?

Of possible note, I did try to option of seeking help online at Apple, and the frozen computer did connect me, so much of its guts, including web access, appears to be functional, but I just can't access stored material.

My next option is to restore using a Time Machine backup.  Here's where I have to offer a "mea culpa" and admit that I don't keep the Time Machine constantly attached to the Mac because my desk is so full of gadgets (printers/scanners, digital microscope, USB extender, lamp, SAD light etc.  So my last complete backup was in mid-February.  I can restore from there, losing a couple months of bookmarks for the blog (many hundreds of them) and various Word documents and uploaded photos.

More importantly, restoring to February status will lose my entire Turbotax tax return, which I had joyfully completed yesterday.  Today was to be the day to file online and submit payment.  I don't know if I can retrieve the entered data from Turbotax online on this old computer or whether it's only stored on the crashed hard disk.

So I am frantically looking for some way to revive the Mac with the frozen progress bar.  I'll be seeking help from Apple online and perhaps over the phone.  In the meantime I'm seeking help from readers who might have any suggestions for me.

This isn't the end of Life As We Know It, but absent a satisfactory recovery, especially of my tax data, I'm just not going to have time to blog for at least several weeks.

Nighttime Addendum:

You learn something every day.  Reader Charlie has introduced me to rebooting in Verbose mode (command-V).  I just did so, and the screen lit up with line after line of TMI-for-an-English-major:



Eventually it settled in to a mantra of "too many corpses" -


That continued past the 300th iteration before I finally had mercy on it and powered it down for the night.

Charlie, there may be a clarification of what's going on earlier in the readout, but I couldn't find a way to scroll up to get closeup photos.  Tomorrow after the Mac and I both get some rest, I'll try another Verbose boot with camera in hand.

If I ever start a band, "Too Many Corpses" might be an interesting name.  I've appended it to the title of this post for now...

Addendum #2

Excellent information at Robin Monks for any reader experiencing the same problem.

Addendum #3
Oh joy !!!


It looks like we are back in business, boys and girls.  TLDR: I reinstalled the operating system.  I don't THINK I lost anything, but I'm not touching anything right now until Time Machine is finished making a complete backup of whatever's there.

I'll leave some notes in the comment thread for those interested in the technical aspect of the problem and its solution.

Best case scenario I'll still be busy tonight and tomorrow with taxes and eBay and stuff.  TYWKIWDBI should reanimate Wednesday or Thursday.

Addendum #4: problem recurs

Gloom returns the next morning -


When I pushed the start button and heard no susumi chime and the screen started to open black instead of grey I had a sinking feeling.  The progress bar has been frozen at 99% for half an hour.

Thankfully I did get my taxes finished and e-filed just before midnight last night.

Now to resume troubleshooting.  Apparently reinstalling the OS was a workaround rather than a fix.  Whatever gremlin is doing this is still in there.  I'll be rebooting in various modes and probably ordering a USB-to-Thunderbolt or Firewire-to-Thunderbolt connector from Amazon, or else I'll just haul the iMac over to the Apple store.

So, no blogging for a while.  *sigh*

Addendum #5: problem gone (for the moment)

The sequence of events is getting a bit fragmented between the text of this post itself and the ever-enlarging Comment thread below.  I don't have time to "optimize" the narrative, but I'll summarize with another addendum -

When the frozen progress bar first appeared, rebooting in Safe mode (space bar) didn't help.  After I used the Recovery mode reboot (R) to reinstall the operating system (which incidentally also updated from OSX 10.13.3 to 10.13.4) I was able to access the desktop.

Then the problem recurred.  But this time (with new operating system in place) I was able to access the desktop via a Safe mode reboot.  I read (or one of the readers told me) that if the problem can be bypassed by a Safe mode reboot, then the problem probably lies in the login or startup files because the Safe mode deactivates login items.

So I restarted Safe mode, got to the desktop and went to System Preferences > Users and Groups to see what my "Login items" are. There were 6 of them: System Events, iAntiVirus, Microsoft AU Daemon, Adobe Resource Synchronizer, Dropbox, and SMART reporter.

I started looking some of them up to see what I could maybe do without.  Never did find exactly was "System Events" was.  The Microsoft "AU Daemon" is an AutoUpdater for Microsoft Office.  Dropbox and SMART reporter I remember as being add-ons that I never have used directly.

I couldn't find a way to "turn them off and back on" so it was late in the evening and I said (literally) WTF I'm just going to delete them.  Did so, pulled down the Restart command - and the iMac opened to the desktop !!  I was so happy I went directly to Civilization V and finished my Genghis Khan campaign.

This morning was the acid test.  Would I need a Safe Mode reboot?  Nope.  Started up fine.f

I don't know if the problem is fixed or dormant.  I could have an occult malignancy somewhere in the computer, but I'm guessing (it's only that) that one of the startup items caused a conflict with some other item that had been updated, or it became corrupted/went insane.  It would be ironic if the glitch that I was calling a "gremlin" turns out to be Microsoft's "Daemon."

If this problem stays fixed with this relatively simple intervention that can be performed by any elderly English major, I should probably revise the title of this post with some keywords that would be useful to others searching the same problem.

So, things are working and I have a current TimeMachine backup.  I also have dozens of new links for the blog that I bookmarked on my old iMac.  Eventually I should probably run some diagnostics.  But first, real life calls.  We're getting yet another snowstorm and I have some paperwork to attend to.

Barring surprises, I should be able to resume blogging on Friday.

12 April 2018

An example of "Troxler fading"


Fix your gaze on the center of this image (the black pixel) and stare at it for about 20 seconds.  The colors will disappear.
Troxler's fading has been attributed to the adaptation of neurons vital for perceiving stimuli in the visual system. It is part of the general principle in sensory systems that unvarying stimuli soon disappear from our awareness. For example, if a small piece of paper is dropped on the inside of one's forearm, it is felt for a short period of time. Soon, however, the sensation fades away.
An even more dramatic example is in the video at Digg.

This is a "bulbous bow"


An interesting article at Hakai Magazine entitled "The Secret Language of Ships" explains and illustrates many of the interesting features of ships.  This bow shape is designed to reduce drag.  I found more information at Wikipedia:
A conventionally shaped bow causes a bow wave. A bulb alone forces the water to flow up and over it forming a trough. Thus, if a bulb is added to a conventional bow at the proper position, the bulb trough coincides with the crest of the bow wave, and the two cancel out, reducing the vessel's wake. While inducing another wave stream saps energy from the ship, canceling out the second wave stream at the bow changes the pressure distribution along the hull, thereby reducing wave resistance.

Brutal

The Onion doesn't pull punches.  Also on the same page "Jealous Paul Ryan Asks Legislator With 37% Approval Rating What His Secret Is."

Some would call this "political theater"


A Guardian videographer captured this surreal moment when 28 photographers zoom in on Mark Zuckerberg. 

I also like this reverse angle which captured the absence of most Congressmen, who were apparently called away to urgent fundraising activities.

11 April 2018

Paul Ryan is retiring. This man wants to take his seat in the House.


Paul Ryan currently represents Wisconsin's 1st congressional district (the Milwaukee area).   The Republican who wants to take his place is Paul Nehlen, a white nationalist.  Paul Ryan does not endorse him:
“There are many qualified conservatives who would be effective representatives for Wisconsin’s 1st Congressional District, and Paul Nehlen isn’t one of them,” said Kevin Seifert, the head of Ryan’s political operation. “His bigoted rhetoric and his reprehensible statements should disqualify him from holding any public office and we are confident voters in Southern Wisconsin feel the same way.”
There are currently three other candidates - one Republican and two Democrats (links with information about each at Ballotpedia).

To me, the most interesting one is Randy Bryce. who was featured in a recent article at Vox:
Bryce is a union ironworker and Army veteran. He was a Bernie Sanders supporter in 2016, serving as a Sanders delegate from Wisconsin during the Democratic National Convention. He’s proud of his working-class roots — unlike a lot of other candidates, it’s typical to see Bryce standing on a construction site with a hard hat on in his campaign ads, rather than wearing a suit...

He’s indicated he’s a different kind of Democrat, and has also been cautious when talking about whether he would support House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi if she were to run for speaker if Democrats can retake the majority in 2018...

Bryce is a supporter of Medicare-for-all and has said he would sign on to the bill that is currently proposed in the House. He’s running on a platform that focuses mostly on jobs and the economy and has made infrastructure a huge focus of his campaign...
I've embedded his first campaign video above.  It's very effective.

10 April 2018

Epidemic of "zombie-like" raccoons in Ohio attributed to distemper

Coggeshall thought something was wrong with the raccoon, since it was out in broad daylight. What came next confirmed that. As Coggeshall left his garage to try to shoo the animal away, the raccoon stood up on its hind feet and flashed its sharp, white teeth and pink gums. Saliva dripped from its mouth.

Suddenly, it collapsed into a comatose-like state, Coggeshall said. It soon awoke from its lethargy, walked around for a bit, then got back up on its hind feet again.

“It was kind of startling,” Coggeshall told The Washington Post. “And it kept coming back to the house. It was at my door about two or three times.”
Over a dozen cases reported in the past week.  Details and a video news report at The Washington Post.  Photo credit Robert Coggeshall.

A mechanical model of Cardano's Hypocycloid


I've seen animations of hypocycloids before, but not a working model.  Most interesting.

Found at The Awesomer, via Neatorama.

TYWKIWDBI supports The Guardian


The Guardian does not have a paywall.  Instead, they simply (and politely) request that visitors make a contribution - which I occasionally do.

I'm not asking readers of TYWKIWDBI to support the Guardian, but I do strongly suggest that when you find an interesting and useful website, that you make a donation - however small - both as a simple "thank you" and as an investment in our collective future.

"Glitter beer" contains titanium and mica

Glitter beer has become the “what will they think of next?” beer story of this spring, part of the larger trend of sparkly foods from doughnuts to pizza and cupcakes. Many news outlets have run stories of local breweries jumping into the fad...

Eichelberger said the German-made glitter he’s using does not affect flavor. It contains titanium
dioxide — a white compound that’s used as a pigment in paint and sunscreen — and tiny flakes of mica, a pearlescent mineral that’s the same stuff found in kids’ craft projects and teenagers’ hair.
All of that sounds not super great to put in your body, but if the Food and Drug Administration says it’s safe (it does), let’s have a glitter beer party! (Really, though, titanium dioxide is commonly used as a food coloring, and mica flakes have been in toothpaste for years.)...

Glitter beer has incited many eye rolls and much hand-wringing from purists, especially on beer Twitter. But appearance has always been a part of beer evaluation, and rather serious beer writer Jeff Alworth noted on his “Beervana” podcast that glitter allows a drinker to follow the usually hidden convection cycle of a beer as it is agitated while pouring and drinking.
More information at the Wisconsin State Journal.

Astronaut demonstrates rotational inertia

"The effect shown in this clip is true for any object that has three different moments of inertia, e.g. as shown here for a prism. If you try to spin the object along two of its axes, it will spin in a smooth stable way, as shown here. In particular, these axes are the ones that have the highest and lowest moment of inertia. On the other hand, if you try to spin it around the axis with the intermediate moment of inertia, things get a bit chaotic. The reason is that any small perturbation (e.g. if you didn't throw it perfectly or if a whiff of wind blows) in the motion will cause the object to try to rotate about another axis of rotation as well. The net result is that you get the tumbling you see in the GIF. This effect is called the intermediate axis theorem, or the tennis racket theorem. In case you are interested in a more technical explanation, I posted a longer write-up here a while back."
More discussion at the Wikipedia entry on the Tennis Racket Theorem and at the Educational GIFs subreddit source.

Relevant re Congress' questioning of Zuckerberg

They may be pelting him with softballs:
Members of the House and Senate committees that will question Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg about user privacy protection next week are also some of the biggest recipients of campaign contributions from Facebook employees directly and the political action committee funded by employees.

The congressional panel that got the most Facebook contributions is the House Energy and Commerce Committee, which announced Wednesday morning it would question Zuckerberg... Members of the committee, whose jurisdiction gives it regulatory power over Internet companies, received nearly $381,000 in contributions tied to Facebook since 2007, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. The center is a non-partisan, non-profit group that compiles and analyzes disclosures made to the Federal Election Commission.

The second-highest total, $369,000, went to members of the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, which announced later that it would have a joint hearing with the Senate Judiciary Committee to question Zuckerberg on Tuesday. Judiciary Committee members have received $235,000 in Facebook contributions...

“Powerful interests provide lots of money to the committees that have jurisdiction over them, and they do it to gain influence with those members of Congress,” Wertheimer said. “It’s a fundamental problem that exists throughout the system and throughout the committee structure, and it undermines public confidence that the members are going to make decisions in the best interests of the American people.”

Overall, Facebook has contributed $1.1 million to House members, split almost evenly between the parties...
More at USA Today.  We all know how this bullshit system works.  If candidate A is running against candidate B, instead of giving $20,000 to candidate A, a company gives $10,000 to A and $10,000 to B.  Then, whichever one wins feels beholden to the corporation for its "support," which wasn't in fact support.  It stinks to high heaven.  

"Plus, nearly 30 members of Congress own Facebook stock, according to a story in Roll Call, including two Democratic members of the committee who will question Zuckerberg next week."

09 April 2018

06 April 2018

Looks like phocomelia ("T. rex arms")...


... but it's just an optical illusion.  The mother has normal arms.  Look closely.

Phocomelia.

Via.

Car with dashcam left at the dealership..


There are lots of stories about cars being taken on joy rides by service technicians, but this customer left his dashcam on and was able to document not just the frivolous "test drive" but the failure to provide service.
"Paid Over $700 for transmission service and it wasn’t even done! Car was on the Hoist for 11 minutes! And charges for Over 90 minutes labour!! "

'Qui ouvre une école, ferme une prison.'


The title is a quote from Victor Hugo: "Each time you open a new school, you shut down a prison."

Photo cropped for size and emphasis and brightened from the original here.

Snake

Jingtai County, Baiyin City, Gansu Province, China.  This is a section of mountain road leading to the Yellow Stone Forest.
Looks ever-so-much like the garter snakes we used to have in our yard when I was growing up in Minnesota.  They seem to be less common these days.

The photo is from a remarkable gallery posted at The Atlantic of winning entries in the Sony World Photography competition.

Credit © Li Wang, China, Commended, Open, Travel (Open competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards.

Cars in the movies

Adult cured of sickle-cell disease by stem cell transplant

The recipient was fortunate to have an HLA-perfect-match donor:
An Edmonton woman who received donor stem cells from her sister during a procedure in Calgary last year has been declared cured of her sickle-cell disease and health officials believe Revée Agyepong is the first adult in Canada to be cured of the disease through this method...

“When Revée approached us, we had coincidentally been thinking about adult stem cell transplant for sickle-cell disease based on the remarkably good outcomes that Alberta Children’s Hospital has been seeing with transplants in the pediatric population,” explained Dr. Daly in a released statement. “She met all the necessary criteria in terms of being able to tolerate a transplant but, most important, she had a sibling who was a 100 per cent match.”

The procedure proved successful but there are concerns as her immune system will remain compromised as a result of the anti-rejection drugs. The side-effects are expected to persist for another year.

On Tuesday, blood tests confirmed the 26-year-old was sickle-cell disease free.

"Over the past few months, what we've seen is that Revée's sister's bone marrow has taken over the production of Revée's red blood cells," said Dr. Daly. "The amount of sickle-cell hemoglobin in her bloodstream has decreased almost to zero."
Anyone who has ever seen a sickler in crisis, with excruciating pain in every bone in their body from no fault of their own, will appreciate what an absolutely awesome event this is.  I have a family member who received stem cells to treat scleroderma, and spoke this week to a woman whose son received intraarticular stem cells to try to reverse degenerative arthritis.  Macular degeneration, ALS, and other "incurable" diseases are being studied.  Amazing.

Bluebonnets


I lived in Texas for ten years, but never got to the Hill Country region while the bluebonnets were in bloom.  This photo is too highly saturated for my taste, but there can be no doubt about the beauty and impressiveness of the spectacle.   Years ago I was fortunate enough to visit Kew when the bluebells were blooming in profusion, and always loved the woodlands of central Kentucky carpeted with Blue-Eyed-Marys in the spring.

Icarus


The furthest-from-earth non-supernova star was discovered incidentally because its light emissions were lensed around a cluster of galaxies.
MACS J1149+2223 Lensed Star-1, also known as Icarus, is a blue supergiant observed through a gravitational lens and the most distant individual star detected, at 9 billion light-years from Earth... Light from the star was emitted 4.4 billion years after the Big Bang.  According to co-discoverer Patrick Kelly, the star is at least a hundred times more distant than the next-farthest non-supernova star observed, and is the first magnified individual star seen.
More at the link.  I find it curiously difficult to think about this star using verbs in the present tense, since everything we know about it (position, size, wavelengths) describe it nine billion years ago.

Related (with some discussion of gravitational lensing): The first "multiple-image gravitationally-lensed supernova."

Also related: List of star extremes (nearest, oldest, brightest, hottest, least massive, fastest moving...)

03 April 2018

Fishing nets


I didn't know what they were either, until I read a caption.  Still don't know how they work...

Credit Yen Sin Wong/ Travel (Open competition) /2018 Sony World Photography Awards, via.

The first American tea


Excerpts from an article at the always-amazing Atlas Obscura:
Cassina, or black drink, the caffeinated beverage of choice for indigenous North Americans, was brewed from a species of holly native to coastal areas from the Tidewater region of Virginia to the Gulf Coast of Texas. It was a valuable pre-Columbian commodity and widely traded. Recent analyses of residue left in shell cups from Cahokia, the monumental pre-Columbian city just outside modern-day St. Louis and far outside of cassina’s native range, indicate that it was being drunk there. The Spanish, French, and English all documented American Indians drinking cassina throughout the American South, and some early colonists drank it on a daily basis. They even exported it to Europe...

Upon export to Europe, cassina was marketed in England under the names “Carolina tea” and “South Sea tea,” and in France as “appalachina,” likely a reference to the Appalachee people.This confusing array of names emphasizes the practicality of the Linnaean classification system, which was still in its infancy when Europeans learned of cassina. William Aiton, an eminent British botanist and horticulturist, director of Kew Gardens, and “Gardener to His Majesty,” is credited with giving cassina the scientific name it bears to this day: Ilex vomitoria. Ilex is the genus commonly known as holly. Vomitoria roughly translates to “makes you vomit.”...

In the earliest days of the Southern colonies—when plantations were being carved out of woodland and luxury imports were rare—cassina drinking was widespread from slaves to plantation owners. But as plantations became larger and more profitable, the nouveau riche demonstrated their wealth by drinking expensive imported tea.
For further discussion of the NON-emetic properties of the tea, see Atlas Obscura.

Biomimicry


One of these is a Peregrine falcon.  The other is a B-2 bomber.
The peregrine falcon reaches faster speeds than any other animal on the planet when performing the stoop, which involves soaring to a great height and then diving steeply at speeds of over 320 km/h (200 mph), hitting one wing of its prey so as not to harm itself on impact. The air pressure from such a dive could possibly damage a bird's lungs, but small bony tubercles on a falcon's nostrils are theorized to guide the powerful airflow away from the nostrils, enabling the bird to breathe more easily while diving by reducing the change in air pressure. To protect their eyes, the falcons use their nictitating membranes (third eyelids) to spread tears and clear debris from their eyes while maintaining vision. A study testing the flight physics of an "ideal falcon" found a theoretical speed limit at 400 km/h (250 mph) for low-altitude flight and 625 km/h (388 mph) for high-altitude flight. In 2005, Ken Franklin recorded a falcon stooping at a top speed of 389 km/h (242 mph).
Discussion of biomimetics/biomimicry hereVia.

White House intern diversity


Where's Waldo?

Photo credit Shealah Craighead/White House.

Available


Best comment from the discussion thread:
"Alternating between upper and lower case and style...like a good ransom note."

The efficacy of sugar in wound healing

This is not new information, but the BBC has a nice brief review:
As a child growing up in poverty in the rural Eastern Highlands of Zimbabwe, Moses Murandu was used to having salt literally rubbed in his wounds when he fell and cut himself. On lucky days, though, his father had enough money to buy something which stung the boy much less than salt: sugar...

To treat a wound with sugar, all you do, Murandu says, is pour the sugar on the wound and apply a bandage on top. The granules soak up any moisture that allows bacteria to thrive. Without the bacteria, the wound heals more quickly...

The sugar Murandu uses is the plain, granulated type you might use to sweeten your tea... he found that it worked for diabetics without sending their glucose levels soaring. “Sugar is sucrose – you need the enzyme sucrase to convert that into glucose,” he says. As sucrase is found within the body, it is only when the sugar is absorbed that it is converted. Applying it to the outside of the wound isn’t going to affect it in the same way...

McMichael, who works at the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital, first started using both sugar and honey on pets back in 2002. She said it was a combination of the simplicity of the method and the low cost that attracted her – especially for pet owners who couldn’t afford the usual methods of bringing the animal to the hospital and using sedation.

McMichael says that they keep both sugar and honey in their surgery and often used it on dogs and cats (and occasionally on farm animals). Honey has similar healing properties to sugar (one study found it to be even more effective at inhibiting bacterial growth), though it is more expensive...

As well as being cheaper, sugar has another upside: as more and more antibiotics are used, we are becoming resistant to them.
Anyone who doubts that wounds can be difficult to treat has never seen a sacral decubitus ulcer that has burrowed down to the level of the vertebral bodies.  I do hope that more attention is paid to non-antibiotic interventions.
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