11 May 2022

Fetus

The New York Times has removed the word “fetus” from its Wordle answers to keep the game “distinct from the news”, a move apparently related to last week’s leaked Roe v Wade supreme court draft ruling...

The game’s answer-list is pre-written and assigned to a date.  “When we discovered last week that this particular word would be featured today, we switched it for as many solvers as possible,” the newspaper said...

“At New York Times Games, we take our role seriously as a place to entertain and escape, and we want Wordle to remain distinct from the news,” the Times said... When the Times acquired Wordle it also removed words such as “lynch,” “slave” and “wench”.
I understand that some people are offended by words, but I think this is an overreaction.

7 comments:

  1. More importantly, given that the game is originally British, fetus would be an affront to the British spelling, foetus.

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    Replies
    1. foetus This spelling is the most common in most Commonwealth nations, except in the medical literature, where fetus is used. The more classical spelling fetus is used in Canada and the United States. In addition, fetus is now the standard English spelling throughout the world in medical journals. The spelling faetus was also used historically.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fetus

      Also, Foetus is a solo musical project of Australian musician JG Thirlwell.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foetus_(band)

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    2. Yeah, well, the number of times I have had to flagellate myself for not thinking of the American spelling of a word. Much more of that abuse and I'll be thrown in gaol.

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  2. In today's easy-to-be-offended culture, I would say the paper is staying ahead of the wave.

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  3. The NYT has removed many words from the original list. FETUS was actually scheduled for 5/17/2022.
    This guy had been keeping track but hasn't updated for this change, yet.
    https://medium.com/@owenyin/here-lies-wordle-2021-2027-full-answer-list-52017ee99e86

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  4. If one accepts the right of Twitter to ban Trump, or other people, for terms-of-service violations, then one must accept the right of the Times to remove certain words. You can't have it both ways.

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    Replies
    1. Personally I absolutely wouldn't argue with the Times having the RIGHT to remove words. It's private property and they can do whatever TF they want in that regard. But I do feel it's a bit snowflake-y. Just my opinion.

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