28 March 2021

Immigrant groups in Minnesota, 1900 - 2019


The graphic above was compiled and published in 2001.  In 1900 new immigrants (born elsewhere) constituted a full quarter of the state's population.  In response to a request to update the data, the StarTribune posted this graphic today:

12 comments:

  1. oooo data! Assuming that having arrived 'from foreign' in 1900, folks didn't leave the state, then the the rate of 'natural increase' differs interestingly. By 1990, Irish have increased 26x, Germans 17x and Norwegians 7x. No wonder St Patrick's Day is so big in the US.

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  2. Unfortunately, the Star Tribune only updated with percentages, as I find the actual numbers also tell an interesting story. In 1900, out of a much smaller population, something like 8-10x were foreign-born.

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  3. Interesting. I am still cogitating on the fact that 62% of foreign-born people in Minnesota come from the other 190 countries in the world. There must be several countries that are within 1 or 1.5 percent of Vietnam at number 5?

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  5. Just want to point out that there are no New Zealanders on that list.
    Not one.

    Now I'm not saying that that means New Zealand is better than Minnesota, I'm just saying that not even a single New Zealander has chosen to move to Minnesota. Ever !

    The facts speak for themselves.

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    1. Well, according to the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS), in 2019, 8 immigrants from New Zealand applied for and gained permanent resident status in the great state of Minnesota. (844 New Zealanders total for the USA in 2019, California the most at 214)

      Now, I will grant you that 8 is not many, but it appears that more than a single New Zealander has chosen to move to Minnesota, and many other US States.

      The facts do indeed speak for themselves.

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  6. I haven't had Laotian food (to my knowledge) but I bet it is better than German food.

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    1. I've never had Laotian beer, but I bet German beer is better.

      BTW, my daughter has a friend at college whose parents are from Laos. They use the term "Lao" as an adjective.

      I found this regarding Lao V Laotian: https://theculturetrip.com/asia/laos/articles/is-it-lao-or-laotian-in-laos-theres-a-big-difference/

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  7. When I say 8-10x, I meant that the total number of immigrants was 8 to 10 times larger in the 1900s. When I add up the five figures for the 1900 count, I get around 400,000. When I add up the five figures for the right-hand count, I get around 45,000. Minnesota used to be a very international society.

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    1. Maybe. I haven't accessed the primary data, but I'm pretty sure the 1900 numbers do not represent the number of new immigrants that year, but rather the number in the state at that time (a 50+ year accumulation), whereas the 1990 data are # immigrants arriving in one year.

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  8. A Laotian girl joined my 3rd-grade class in Mankato, MN, in 1980 or so. I've worked with and known a lot of immigrants as an adult, but I was too young at that time to understand why she had come to our class. I've often wondered what her story was and what happened to her and her family.

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