10 December 2019

Can some reader figure this out??



Video posted at BoingBoing this morning.  No answer there (yet) as to why these interconnected circles were created in what appears to be tidal mud flats.  Are they weirs?  Evaporative catchments for mineral extraction?  What???

Location said to be near Isla Aguada (Campeche) in Mexico.  Note the immense extent of the structures.  The connecting "canals" appear to have been created or enhanced with large earth-moving equipment.  Some look fresh, and there are what looks like older ones that have silted in.

This blog has amazing readership.  I suspect someone will know or can research the answer.

Solved within three hours!  (answer in Rocky's comment)

Addendum:  Here's an interesting screencap I made from the map of the Democratic Republic of the Congo linked in jschmidt's comment:


Fascinating.  There must be more information somewhere...

Addendum:  Found some relevant information in a video about mangrove restoration in Thailand (relevant part at the 7:40-8:40 segment or so).  Apparently those drainage channels are dug by hand with shovels.

14 comments:

  1. theyr're what, afraid to land and take a closer look?

    I-)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Looks like my first thought is correct - Mangrove re-establishment
    http://www.res.ku.edu/~crgc/blog/?p=658

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Excellent, rocky. Using those key words I was able to find more information about the process:

      https://mangroveactionproject.org/restoration-demonstration-sites/

      I also left the information at the BoingBoing post.

      Delete
  3. Oops, I didn't pay attention to the date on the above blog post.
    So, maybe an unsuccessful project

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm guessing some kind of fish trap or aquaculture. If the tree line is the high tide mark, fish get caught between the "walls". The walls and circles are excavation material.

    ReplyDelete
  5. OK I watched it again, they're not walls, they're channels, so not fish traps.
    2nd guess: Before the lake around Mexico City was filled in, it was used for sustainable farming growing various water plants for roots, stems & flowers. Farmers pulled sediments off the lake bed, piled it up for compost, and planted crops on it. I think this video shows it's still being done by someone. I've heard of an archaeological experiment to see how much that kind of farming can produce.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Sandworms. Beware.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I cannot believe you guys! This is obviously some sort of construct by aliens, perhaps where they land their UFOs...or maybe some sort of language they read from the sky.

    So help me, every time I start thinking there's hope for mankind, someone comes up with mangrove nonsense!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Sandworms is good. I was going to go with crap circles from the alien overlords but wasn't sure if the word crap is a bit nasty for an international market. But no, sandworms is the best.

    ReplyDelete
  9. so I am guessing these have to do with mangroves but I can't figure out how they are made.

    https://www.google.com/maps/place/Democratic+Republic+of+the+Congo/@-8.7669117,26.0412101,2210m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x1979facf9a7546bd:0x4c63e5eac93f141!8m2!3d-4.038333!4d21.758664

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Awesome find, jschmidt!! I've made a screencap from your link and appended it to the body of the post.

      Delete
    2. I found more information, jschmidt. See the video in the second addendum of the post. :-)

      Delete

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