06 October 2016

Today (10/6) is Mad Hatter Day


Explained here:
Mad Hatter Day is 10/6. The date was chosen from the illustrations by John Tenniel in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, wherein the Mad Hatter is always seen wearing a hat bearing a slip of paper with the notation "In this style 10/6". We take this as inspiration to behave in the style of the Mad Hatter on 10/6 (which is October 6 here, although in Britain MadHatterDay occurs on June 10...but I digress...)

Mad Hatter Day began in Boulder, CO, in 1986, among some computer folk who had nothing better to do. It was immediately recognized as valuable because they caused less damage than if they'd been doing their jobs.
As I searched this topic on the 'net today, it was interesting to see how many observers misinterpret the 10/6 on his hat as being either a style number ("The Mad Hatter’s top hat, according to Lewis Carroll, was of the 10/6 style") or worse ("my birthdate (10/6) is on his hat although I think that is his hat size!"). The correct interpretation, of course, is that "the paper in the Mad Hatter's Hat was really an order to make a hat in the style shown, to cost ten shillings sixpence."

(Reposted from 2011)

10 comments:

  1. I had always thought it was as if the hat had been grabbed off of a display of various hats. Looking at this hat, "in this style, 10/6" The next hat over, "in this style, 10/8" and so forth.

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  2. I had always thought it was the hat size being shown in a nonsense fraction 10 over 6 in a display of apparent madness. Thanks For the enlightenment.

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  3. I'm delighted that my Mad Hatter Day page is still amusing the internet after all these years.

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  4. The correct colloquialisms are "ten and six", or "ten shillings AND sixpence" or even "ten bob and a tanner". Nowadays it's just the rather boring and significantly devalued "55p".

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    Replies
    1. yer absotively correct - it is the price of the hat, not a date.

      I-)

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  5. I thought it was some kind of betting slip.

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  6. over on the continent, don't they use the '10th of june' date convention? :-)

    I-)

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  7. Pretty much everywhere in the world other than the U.S. would see 10/6 as being the tenth of june if seen as a date. The label in the hat, to any british person of the pre-decimal currency era, (started in 1970) would see that label for what it is, a price label.

    Consequently, the idea that the tenth of October should be 'Mad Hatter Day' makes no sense at all, and is thus, in the spirit of the 'Alice in Wonderland' books, perfectly cromulent.

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  8. Now I know. Missed Broderick Crawford Day this year. 10-4.

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    Replies
    1. 2150 bye

      Although I first read it as "Miss Broderick Crawford Day"
      Which I thought would be a mighty odd celebration.

      Delete

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