24 September 2012

A landscape in the Dolomites


The topography is stunning (and I'm wondering what crop it is that is farmed on those slopes).  Click for bigger.

Photo by Kevin Kunstadt, from a collection of images of the Dolomites.

11 comments:

  1. Probably mountain grass, fodder for the livestock during the winter.

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    1. That would make sense. It looked like a row crop, but presumably that's just the pattern of the windrows prior to baling. Thanks, Hayes.

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  2. I wouldn't mind going to work there every day. Inspiring view! Are you certain it's not a photoshop? That looks a lot like some of the work I have seen in the contests at http://www.worth1000.com/ I hope it's real, though!

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    1. " Are you certain it's not a photoshop?"

      Yes. Take a look at some of the photographer's other images in the photostream at the first link I provided.

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    2. Sadly, the site at that link says - now but not before? - that digital versions of photos in the book are not available.

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  3. Having been to the dolomites a couple of times now, I can say that Hayes is correct - it is mountain grass. And Timothy no it is not photoshopped, I haven't seen that particular rock formation (it's a big place) but many others like it.

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  4. Reminds me of Cradle Mountain / Lake St Clair in Tasmania, only a bit more spectacular. I've walked the Cradle Mountain loop in Tassie, but I'd love to walk the Dolomites ... *sigh*.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/downunderendeavours/3077916424/lightbox/
    http://www.australiantraveller.com/city-highlight/020-peak-at-cradle-mountain

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    1. Wow. (Wisconsin and Minnesota are sadly mountain-deficient).

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  5. My undergrad geology department used to do field camps in the Italian dolomites. I just missed being around for the last year of it. :(

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  6. This is man-made. In the alps you can see very similar structures on the slopes in summer (usually its scaffolding though). This is done to decrease the risk of big avalanches in winter.

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